October Court Day! A celebration of, among other things, the Second Amendment

When I was growing up in Mt Sterling, Kentucky, there was a tradition called October Court Day. Court Day is the third Monday in October, and it was when the rural folk would bring all sorts of their produce and hand-made goods to town for sale or trade. Having been away from the Bluegrass State since 1984, I hadn’t been to Court Day, Mt Sterling’s biggest day of the year, in well over 30 years.

And I’m somewhat disappointed to tell you that much of the eastern Kentucky rural feel of Court Day has vanished, and much of the celebration is now just an overgrown flea market. There was a bit more of the old fashioned feel at the Court Days in Preston, but, alas! I forgot my camera on Saturday.

However, if Mt Sterling Court Day — and it’s really the whole weekend, Saturday through Monday — has become too flea marketized, there’s one thing you can still buy there: firearms! Click on any photo to enlarge.

Firearms booth on South Queen Street

Firearms booth on South Queen Street. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

I bought both a bolt-action .22 rifle and a 20-gauge shotgun at Court Day, when I was in junior high school. No one thought anything about a 13 or 14-year-old boy walking back up Maysville Road, past both the elementary and high schools, in view of where the police station was at the time, with a long gun over his shoulder. More photos below the fold.

Part of the display at a firearms dealer on South Queen Street

Part of the display at a firearms dealer on South Queen Street. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

It appears as though the festival organizers segregated out the firearms sellers, keeping them all along a stretch of South Queen Street. That’s fine: the free buying and selling of weapons was not inhibited. Member’s of Mt Sterling’s small Police Department were working, and visible, not all of them patrolling the firearms sales area.

Display from another firearms dealer set up on South Queen Street

Display from another firearms dealer set up on South Queen Street. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

Were I a wild-eyed leftist, I’d have been shocked, shocked! that weapons were out in public display, and that people who had bought guns were walking along the public streets, visibly armed with both long guns and sidearms. But, in small-town Kentucky, nobody cared, nobody was worried that law-abiding citizens were somehow going to morph into mass killers and shoot down everyone around.

That is what the Second Amendment means, that the rights of law-abiding people should not be infringed just because there are some criminals out there. It ought to be a simple concept, perhaps too simple for the oh-so-sophisticated left to understand: criminals don’t obey the law, and they won’t obey gun control laws. All that the kind of gun control that Nancy Pelosi and her fellow travelers would like to see would do is to disarm the people who don’t break the law, take away rights for hunting and self-defense from the kind of people we want and need in our society.

A firearms booth on South Queen Street. It's set up in front of a house where I delivered The Lexington Herald-Leader when I was in high school.  I was told that my old customer still lives there, a 95-year-old gentleman named George. He had his shades drawn, so I did not knock on his door.

A firearms booth on South Queen Street. It’s set up in front of a house where I delivered The Lexington Herald-Leader when I was in high school. I was told that my old customer still lives there, a 95-year-old gentleman named George. He had his shades drawn, so I did not knock on his door. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

Street scene

Street scene. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

The dog on the right was such a good dog that he was carrying his own leash in his mouth.

The dog on the right was such a good dog that he was carrying his own leash in his mouth. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

This was Mt Sterling High School, from which I was graduated in 1971. Closed in 1976, the building sat empty for decades, until its recent conversion to a senior living facility.

This was Mt Sterling High School, from which I was graduated in 1971. Closed in 1976, the building sat empty for decades, until its recent conversion to a senior living facility. Photo by Dana R Pico; reproduction with photo credit is allowed.

One last photo, the building where I went to high school/

One Comment

  1. It ought to be a simple concept, perhaps too simple for the oh-so-sophisticated left to understand:

    I think the left wing scum understand it quite well. Since their goal is to seize more and more power, it’s much easier to do that with a disarmed population.

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