Economics 101: Amazon.com has made me wealthier

No, not through site advertising; I don’t even make a pittance there.

But Saturday night I bought The Particles of the Universe by Jeff Yee, for a whopping 99¢, with no sales tax, delivered to my Tablet in seconds. If I had bought the same book, printed, it would have meant at least $8.95 for the book, 54¢ for sales tax, and around $12 of gasoline to drive to and from Barnes & Noble to get it.

The book, which I just started reading, discusses the theories of Gabriel LaFreniere, which hold that the neutrino is the basic building block of all matter, something unproved and, thus far, unprovable, because we cannot duplicate the conditions immediately following the Big Bang in the laboratory.

Is he right? No one knows yet, but for 99¢, the book is worth it to me.

And this means that Amazon.com has made me wealthier: I don’t consider the 99¢ to be a waste, and I saved something on the order of $20.50, as described above, on buying the book the old fashioned way.

You can buy the Android Tablet that I use for just $50.99, either through the image at the left, or the same one embedded in the sidebar, and I’ll make a whopping $2.04 commission. There are other Kindle readers available on the sidebar. But you don’t have to buy only those products I have advertised for me to get a commission: just use the small amazon.com search widget which links to my amazon associates account, in the sidebar or at the bottom of this article, and anything you buy through that helps me out! :)

I think that the Kindle technology is absolutely great. Our family has three Kindles — one for my wife and each daughter — plus my Tablet, and any book that any of us buys is available on each of the units. My darling bride has a Kindle Fire, like the one at the right, which has alighted screen — standard Kindles do not — which means that she can read in bed with the light off.

Yeah, I’m a greedy capitalist pig, who likes making money, and likes saving money, so all of these links lead back to my commission account. But even if you never buy through any of those links, Kindle technology is a great thing: it saves you money, because Kindle books are (normally) a lot less expensive than printed books, it’s green technology, in that we aren’t using paper and ink to print the books, and not spending gasoline to go to the bookstore to get them, and it doesn’t take up much space: there are whole bookcases full of books on my android tablet, which is slightly smaller than a loose-leaf binder, and only an inch thick, in its padded cover. The rest of the family’s Kindles are smaller than that. Nor are books and Kindles and tablets the only things you can buy on Amazon: you can buy table saws and televisions and topcoats there, too.

Technology is making us wealthier, and, as a good capitalist, I certainly support that!

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