Rule 5 Blogging: From Norway!

It’s the weekend and time, once again, for THE FIRST STREET JOURNAL’S version of Rule 5 Blogging. Robert Stacey Stacy McCain described Rule 5 as posting photos of pretty women somewhat déshabillé, but, on this site, our Rule 5 Blogging doesn’t put up pictures of Kathrine Sørland in her summer clothes, but women, in full military gear, serving their countries in the armed forces. The terribly sexist authors on this site celebrate strong women, women who can take care of themselves and take care of others, women who have been willing to put their lives on the line in some not-so-friendly places, women who truly do have the “We can do it!” attitude.

Today, soldiers from Norway; click photos to enlarge.

Norwegian Army, girl-camp. A recruiting-happening for women.

Norwegian Army, girl-camp. A recruiting-happening for women.

Norwegian Army, girl-camp. A recruiting-happening for women

A Norwegian Soldier, on the border against Russia.

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8 Comments

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  2. Has anyone also noticed all five Scandinavian Countries have crosses on their flags?

    Believe me, that’s NOT what I was looking at!

  3. PS: That blonde in the top picture is absolutely gorgeous! Reminds me a bit of the female lead character in my book, who I introduce as follows:

    She was attractive in that Minnesota Scandinavian blonde sort of way, tall, athletically built, with sparkling blue eyes.

  4. Yorkshire wrote:

    Has anyone also noticed all five Scandinavian Countries have crosses on their flags?

    And notice how the flags are all “backward” when they are on the right shoulder, just as the US flag is “backwards” when on the right shoulder of Army uniforms. That’s because:

    In application, then, flags are displayed on moving vehicles with the blue-star field always displayed towards the front of the vehicle. In this way, the flag appears to be blowing in the wind as the vehicle travels forward (flags are always attached to their flag poles on the blue field side). If the flag were not reversed on the right hand side of the vehicle, the vehicle might appear to be moving backwards (or “retreating”).

  5. Well, the Nordic flags do have a lot of History behind them and it’s from the 13th Century:

    The Flag of Denmark (Danish: Dannebrog Danish pronunciation: [ˈdanəˌbʁoˀ]) is red with a white Scandinavian cross that extends to the edges of the flag; the vertical part of the cross is shifted to the hoist side. The cross design, which represents Christianity,[2][3][4] was subsequently adopted by the other Nordic countries; Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Åland Islands and the Faroe Islands, as well as the Scottish archipelagos of Shetland and Orkney. During the Danish-Norwegian personal union, Dannebrog (“Danish cloth”) was also the flag of Norway and continued to be, with slight modifications, until Norway adopted its current flag in 1821.

    According to legend, the flag came into Danish possession during the Battle of Lyndanisse in 1219. The Danes were on a failing crusade in Estonia, but after praying to God a flag fell from the sky. After this event, Danish King Valdemar II went on to defeat the Estonians. The first recorded uses of the flag appear some one hundred years later.[5]

    The whole story here:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_flag

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  7. Well the crosses will be gone when the Muslims complete their take-over of Scandanavia, for that matter all of Europe.

    Demographics always wins.

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