Rule 5 Blogging: From Across the Pond

It’s the weekend and time, once again, for THE FIRST STREET JOURNAL’S version of Rule 5 Blogging. Robert Stacey Stacy McCain described Rule 5 as posting photos of pretty women somewhat déshabillé, but, on this site, our Rule 5 Blogging doesn’t put up pictures of Kate Moss in her summer clothes, but women, in full military gear, serving their countries in the armed forces. The terribly sexist authors on this site celebrate strong women, women who can take care of themselves and take care of others, women who have been willing to put their lives on the line in some not-so-friendly places, women who truly do have the “We can do it!” attitude.

This week, as Piers Morgan returns to Blighty, here are some of the women who carry guns and protect his sorry ass.

Flight Lieutenant Kirsty Moore (SIC) Flight Lieutenant Kirsty Moore (31) joined the RAF as a pilot in 1998.  Originally from Lincolnshire she has served as an instructor on the Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley in North Wales and is currently flying Tornado GR4 with XIII Sqn based at RAF Marham in Norfolk. The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, is proud to announce that a female pilot is one of two candidates selected to join the world-famous ‘Diamond Nine’ for the 2010 display season.

Flight Lieutenant Kirsty Moore (SIC)
Flight Lieutenant Kirsty Moore (31) joined the RAF as a pilot in 1998. Originally from Lincolnshire she has served as an instructor on the Hawk aircraft at RAF Valley in North Wales and is currently flying Tornado GR4 with XIII Sqn based at RAF Marham in Norfolk.
The Royal Air Force Aerobatic Team, the Red Arrows, is proud to announce that a female pilot is one of two candidates selected to join the world-famous ‘Diamond Nine’ for the 2010 display season.

Flight Lieutenant Juliette Fleming, the RAF pilot who terrified the Taliban in her fighter jet. The pilot has revealed how she terrified Taliban fighters by screeching low over their heads in her Tornado fighter jet – a new tactic to avoid killing civilians with stray bombs. Flight Lieutenant Juliette Fleming, 31, was repeatedly called on to swoop down low over fanatics attacking British and coalition troops on the ground in Afghanistan. The awesome sound of her GR4 jet roaring overhead at 550mph just 100ft above the ground would deafen the enemy and force them to take cover.Flt Lt Fleming carried out her sorties during a three-month posting at Kandahar airfield with 31 Squadron, known as The Goldstars.

Two female drivers of the 19 Combat Service Support Battalion catch some rest and sun at FOB Nolay. Soldiers from 4, 10 and 31 Close Support Squadrons, 19 Combat Service Support Battalion, Royal Logistic Corps along with TA soldiers from 152 (Ulster) Transport Regiment (Volunteers) deliver supplies to Forward Operating Bases (Gibraltar, Nolay and Sangin) in the Helmand river valley. The Force Protection Platoon is provided by Ava Platoon, C Company, 2nd Battalion, The Mercian Regiment. These convoys are known as a Combat Logistic Patrols. Together these soldiers form the Combat Support Logistic Regiment, providing the vital supply function in the Helmand region.

Lt Bridget Compain part of the Special Duties Squadron team who have been training Afghan pilots sits in the cockpit of the Mi-17 helicopter.The UK Joint Helicopter Command began training a number of Afghan pilots and flight engineers in UK in Feb 2008 under PROJECT CURIUM. Supported throughout by QinetiQ, the project is scheduled to complete in Mar 2010 by which time a total of 27 Afghan aircrew will have been trained on the Mi-17 helicopters based at MOD Boscombe Down by the staff of the Special Duties Squadron (SDS).This is a small-scale project with a high return. Time and effort invested in training the Afghan crews enables an eventual withdrawal of UK forces and the programme has already yielded tangible results. A number of crews have completed their training and returned to Afghanistan where initial reports suggest they are a well-respected, competent and motivated cadre of professionals. The crews trained here in UK are the seed corn of an indigenous Afghan National Security Force helicopter capability.

Lance Cpl. Katrina Hodge of the British Army. Off duty, the 22-year-old is Miss England. Her nickname: “Combat Barbie.”At Hodge’s urging, pageant organizers are nixing the swimsuit competition. Instead, the contest will feature a new challenge.“I think it’s nerve-racking enough for girls to get up on a stage and speak,” Hodge tells the Telegraph, “let alone appear in a swimsuit.” Not that Hodge is against wearing bikinis. She models in ads for this lingerie company. Her typical attire, however, is camouflage. Now on six-month leave, Hodge enlisted on a dare from her veteran brother. When she reported for duty in an ultra feminine outfit, her commander dubbed her “Combat Barbie.” For the record, Hodge served with distinction in Iraq. She earned a bravery commendation after a life-threatening incident.“I like the fact I can come to work with no makeup on and roll around in mud,” Hodge tells the Daily Mail.