Is This Malfeasance in Office By Obama???

The By-Stander President has said over and over “if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it, Period. if you like your doctor you can keep him, Period.” I believe these statement in plain everyday English and Diction to make a clear declarative statement that do stand on their own. These need no interpretation or explanation to be understood. Obama has said this and recorded over 20 times. Now lets look at Malfeasance.

mælˈfizəns/ Show Spelled [mal-fee-zuhns] Show IPA noun Law.
the performance by a public official of an act that is legally unjustified, harmful, or contrary to law; wrongdoing (used especially of an act in violation of a public trust). Compare misfeasance ( def 2 ) , nonfeasance.

Now at least 20 times or more Obama has said this: “If you like your plan, you can keep it PERIOD”

Now, within the last few days, Obama has taken the word “Period” or end of statement and turned it to another New Lie. Now Obama has dropped PERIOD and now has a new qualifier since people have lost their insurance and doctor. The worst is a woman being treated for FOUR YEARS for Cancer lost her plan and can not find another one to replace it.

It is clear the President has Lied, Misled, stretched beyond all recognition THE TRUTH.

Constitution says:
Section II
Section 4.

The President, Vice President and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.

Meaning of “High Crimes and Misdemeanors”

by Jon Roland, Constitution Society

The question of impeachment turns on the meaning of the phrase in the Constitution at Art. II Sec. 4, “Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors”. I have carefully researched the origin of the phrase “high crimes and misdemeanors” and its meaning to the Framers, and found that the key to understanding it is the word “high”. It does not mean “more serious”. It refers to those punishable offenses that only apply to high persons, that is, to public officials, those who, because of their official status, are under special obligations that ordinary persons are not under, and which could not be meaningfully applied or justly punished if committed by ordinary persons.

Under the English common law tradition, crimes were defined through a legacy of court proceedings and decisions that punished offenses not because they were prohibited by statutes, but because they offended the sense of justice of the people and the court. Whether an offense could qualify as punishable depended largely on the obligations of the offender, and the obligations of a person holding a high position meant that some actions, or inactions, could be punishable if he did them, even though they would not be if done by an ordinary person.

Offenses of this kind survive today in the Uniform Code of Military Justice. It recognizes as punishable offenses such things as perjury of oath, refusal to obey orders, abuse of authority, dereliction of duty, failure to supervise, moral turpitude, and conduct unbecoming. These would not be offenses if committed by a civilian with no official position, but they are offenses which bear on the subject’s fitness for the duties he holds, which he is bound by oath or affirmation to perform.

Perjury is usually defined as “lying under oath”. That is not quite right. The original meaning was “violation of one’s oath (or affirmation)”.

The word “perjury” is usually defined today as “lying under oath about a material matter”, but that is not its original or complete meaning, which is “violation of an oath”. We can see this by consulting the original Latin from which the term comes. From An Elementary Latin Dictionary, by Charlton T. Lewis (1895), Note that the letter “j” is the letter “i” in Latin.
periurium, i, n,, a false oath, perjury.periurus, adj., oath-breaking, false to vows, perjured. iuro, avi, atus, are, to swear, take an oath.iurator, oris, m., a swearer.iuratus, adj., sworn under oath, bound by an oath.ius, iuris, that which is binding, right, justice, duty.per, … IV. Of means or manner, through, by, by means of, … under pretense of, by the pretext of, ….

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