Ethnocentrism in Minnesota

From Ed Morrissey:

MN Congresswoman to Metrodome: Don’t display Redskins name or logo
posted at 11:55 am on October 25, 2013 by

Yes, it’s Betty McCollum, reminding us yet again how much better we’d have been with Teresa Collett instead. Why is she demanding that the venue of an NFL football game not mention the actual name of the visiting team? Because it’s a taxpayer-financed facility, so it has an obligation to never offend even a single person, or something:

“As you are aware, the Washington team is a privately owned business that chooses to use the disparaging and demeaning brand ‘Redskins’ as their mascot,” McCollum wrote. “In my view this NFL team’s mascot is an unacceptable racial slur disparaging to Native Americans and offensive to Minnesotans.

The congresswoman argued that since the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome is financed by taxpayers and has “legal obligations” to ensure no one is offended.

“With regard to the NFL game on November 7th, it would be my hope that all state statutes, ordinances of the City of Minneapolis, and policies of the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA) regarding civil rights, non-discrimination, and affirmative action would be fully reviewed and applied with regard to displaying, publicly announcing, and promoting the Washington team’s racially disparaging name and logo.”

McCollum added that she’s read news reports that “the MSFA may have concerns about limiting the use of the Washington team’s name and logo, as requested by some Native American groups, due to contractual obligations with the NFL.”

“Such concerns should never trump the civil rights and anti-discrimination laws, ordinances, and policies of government bodies charged with defending and advancing the public interest,” she declared.

“The NFL and the owner of Washington’s football team have a right to free speech. Constitutional protections allow them to offend, degrade, and disparage any race, ethic [sp] group, religion, or person of any sexual orientation with their private funds within private spaces,” McCollum continued. “But the people of Minnesota do not have an obligation to open the doors of our public sports facility and allow a for-profit entity to display and promote their racial slur.”

More at the link.

Of course, one might ask what “no one” is offended might mean. Some people might be offended by the outfits that the Minnesota cheerleaders pretend to wear, but they’d just be old fuddy-duddies, and prob’ly white people, so who cares.

Minnesota Vikings logo

But the rather obvious question is: what are Vikings? The Vikings were a population of (very) white northern Europeans, mostly blondes and redheads, so screamingly Caucasian that der Führer would have been proud of them. Should not black Minnesotans, black Americans, and certainly black Vikings players be offended, be outraged, that they are being told, by logo, that the highest standard is to be a blindingly white blonde person?

Of course, Representative McCollum is herself white, so I guess she never noticed how Caucasio-normative she was being. :lol:

10 Comments

  1. If I owned the Redskins I’d change the name. To the Washington Savages. Then I’d remind these idiots to be careful what they wish for.

  2. Or how about the Washington Cannibals?

    Unfortunately, this shit isn’t exactly new. Back in the 90′s, the local paper refused to list ANY team names that involved Indians – high school, college, pro, whatever. It got so bad that, in one World Series, the paper refused to say that the Atlanta Braves were playing the Cleveland Indians.

    It’s all show and posturing. There are plenty of real Indians in this state, and I doubt Mrs. McCullom (Irish, presumably?) spends much or any time worrying about their real life concerns. No, she just wants to get on the boob tube, disrupt an important sporting event, just so she can say “Look how sensitive I am! Look how much I CARE !!!”

  3. But the rather obvious question is: what are Vikings? The Vikings were a population of (very) white northern Europeans, mostly blondes and redheads, so screamingly Caucasian that der Führer would have been proud of them.

    Rush Limbaugh (who is a big pro football fan) used to have a hilarious routine where he would pick teams based on politically correct criteria. Any team that featured white guys (Vikings, Raiders, Buccaneers, etc.) went to the very bottom. And then, on the animal rights/environmentalist whacko scale, any team with animals (Bears, Falcons, Dolphins, etc.) went to the very top. Plus, any team that celebrated violence (Cowboys, plus all of the above from the first list), went to the bottom, too.

    But Rush could make gradations on how bad a team was. The Vikings and Buccaneers both featured violent white guys. But the Buccaneers got an edge on the animal rights front because they had parrots (animals) that they were nice to, whereas the Vikings did not. So, using the Limbaugh method, in a game between Minnesota and Tampa Bay, the correct pick was Tampa Bay.

  4. Quote the Raven “NEVERMORE” as in tolerating this made up bullshit from the Left. They get offended just because they can. Reality must be a self loathing of themselves and live in a world of denial of themselves. Nevermore.
    1 - raven

  5. A plea common in churches along the North sea coast and the English channel and in towns and villages along Europe’s major rivers was, From the fury of the Norsemen, O Lord, deliver us.

    On 8 June 793 the monastery at Lindisfarne, on the east coast of England, was raided by Norwegian Vikings. It was not a good year according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, “In this year fierce, foreboding omens came over the land of Northumbria. There were excessive whirlwinds, lightening storms, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the sky. These signs were followed by a great famine, and on June 8th of the same year, the ravaging of heathen men destroyed God’s church at Lindisfarne.”

    Although there had been earlier Viking raids beginning in 787, the near total destruction of the monastery and the bloodthirsty murder of the monks of Lindisfarne is usually considered as the beginning of the 200-year-long Viking Age.

    Incidentally, Vikings didn’t wear horn helmets, that’s an eye-catching invention of costume designers for Wagnerian operas which was later popularized by Hollywood films.

  6. On 8 June 793 the monastery at Lindisfarne, on the east coast of England, was raided by Norwegian Vikings. It was not a good year according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, “In this year fierce, foreboding omens came over the land of Northumbria. There were excessive whirlwinds, lightening storms, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the sky. These signs were followed by a great famine, and on June 8th of the same year, the ravaging of heathen men destroyed God’s church at Lindisfarne.”

    Wasn’t that featured in “The Vikings” on the Discovery Channel earlier this year?

  7. York, if it wasn’t, it should have been. The story of 8th Century Viking raids couldn’t be responsibly told without featuring the attack on Lindisfarne. It would be like describing the conflict between the US and Japan in WW-2 and leaving out Pearl Harbor.

    BTW, I wonder if it ever occurred to Ms McCollum that plans for the extermination of the Plains Indians (men, women, and children) which once populated her “native” state where once the clear objective for Washington politicians, most notably Abraham Lincoln.

    And, it should be obvious even to dim bulbs like McCollum that no big time sports franchise ever set out to denigrate American Indians by naming a team in their honor.

  8. Rope, It was the History Channel, and YES it was Lindisfarne. I knew it was a monastery, but not which one.
    Lindisfarne Gospels and Vikings

    Posted by Bruce on March 28, 2013 in Ancient History, Christianity, History, World View

    In the History Channel’s new series on the Vikings there is an episode where the Vikings raid the Island of Lindisfarne, a small island off of England’s Northumbrian coast. The raid is thought to be the beginning of Viking adventures on England, Scotland, Ireland, France and just about everywhere else their longships could carry them.

    The Vikings were active in England from about 793 to 1066 AD. At one time most of northern Britain was called the Danelaw because Danish Vikings ruled there.

    In the episode the Viking leader, Ragnar, takes prisoner a Saxon monk by the name of Athelstan. Athelstan speaks the language of the northmen and that’s what probably saves his life. As the Vikings loot the monastery of its treasures (crosses, chalices, candle holders, etc, made from precious metals) Athelstan hides a book under his robes. Ragnar catches him and asks quizzically why the monk would save a book when saving a treasure would make more sense.

    Athelstan replies to the effect that the book, is the Book of John from the Bible and it is indeed a treasure worth far more than precious metals.

    It’s a compelling scene. Ragnar decides to keep Athelstan alive for his own purposes and makes him a slave, although at this point in the series they seem to have more than a slave\master relationship as Ragnar trusts Athelstan with the care of his family when Ragnar goes on another raid to Northumbria.

    This link goes to an excellent link from the BBC that discusses the “Lindisfarne Gospels” and how they were painstakingly created and preserved by the Anglo-Saxon monks over the course of many years.

    Before the invention of the printing press monks painstakingly copied the Bible and other works of literature by hand.

    Few people could read during Europe’s Dark Ages (500-1000 AD roughly) so the work of the monks was vital in passing down the Gospel of Jesus Christ and preserving it in a wonderful work of art that survived devastating Viking raids.

    The scene in the History Channel’s series, Vikings, with Ragnar and Athelstan is not far-fetched and Christians everywhere owe a debt of gratitude to those monks who labored in the preservation of the Bible, something we tend to take for granted now.

    https://broeder10.wordpress.com/2013/03/28/lindisfarne-gospels-and-vikings/

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