Designed to fail

The Democrats wanted a single-payer system all along

And the liberals don’t really even care. From THE WALL STREET JOURNAL:

The Coming ObamaCare Shock

Millions of Americans will pay more for health insurance, lose their coverage, or have their hours of work cut back.
By Daniel P Kessler

In recent weeks, there have been increasing expressions of concern from surprising quarters about the implementation of ObamaCare. Montana Sen. Max Baucus, a Democrat, called it a “train wreck.” A Democratic colleague, West Virginia’s Sen. Jay Rockefeller, described the massive Affordable Care Act as “beyond comprehension.” Henry Chao, the government’s chief technical officer in charge of putting in place the insurance exchanges mandated by the law, was quoted in the Congressional Quarterly as saying “I’m pretty nervous . . . Let’s just make sure it’s not a third-world experience.”

These individuals are worried for good reason. The unpopular health-care law’s rollout is going to be rough. It will also administer several price (and other) shocks to tens of millions of Americans.

Start with people who have individual and small-group health insurance. These policies are most affected by ObamaCare’s community-rating regulations, which require insurers to accept everyone but limit or ban them from varying premiums based on age or health. The law also mandates “essential” benefits that are far more generous than those currently offered.

According to consultants from Oliver Wyman (who wrote on the issue in the January issue of Contingencies, the magazine of the American Academy of Actuaries), around six million of the 19 million people with individual health policies are going to have to pay more—and this even after accounting for the government subsidies offered under the law. For example, single adults age 21-29 earning 300% to 400% of the federal poverty level will be hit with an increase of 46% even after premium assistance from tax credits.

More at the link.

Professor Kessler makes the same mistake that so many other writers do concerning the coming train wreck that is Obamionablecare. The mistake? It is assuming that Obaminablecare was ever intended to work in the first place. It has been reported innumerable places that premiums will increase, by a significant amount, and that existing insurance policies — the ones President Obama told us we could keep if we liked them — will have to be significantly modified because most do not include all of the things deemed to be “essential” benefits under the law and Department of Health and Human Services regulations. People will discover that their free health care isn’t as free as they thought it would be.

When Senator Barack Hussein Obama (D-IL) was running for the 2008 Democratic presidential nomination, he eschewed the single-payer option,1 as did all of the other major Democratic candidates; only the minor candidates Representative Dennis Kucinich (D-OK) and former Senator Mike Gravel (D-AK) based their campaigns on single-payer plans, and they got nowhere during the primaries. Single-payer is way, way, way too much like socialism for most thinking Americans. The Democrats knew that they could not get single-payer passed.

Rather, it was important to get something passed, because they wanted to establish the principle that the federal government was the ultimate guarantor of the individual’s health care coverage. Once that point was established, they believed backtracking from it would not be possible.

And so we wound up with the “we have to pass it so we can find out what’s in it” Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Once it fails, and it will fail — we just don’t know when yet — the Democrats will come back and say, “See, we tried to do it he ‘conservative’ way, using the free market and private insurance industry and existing system, and it just didn’t work; single-payer is the only option we have left.” The option of a return to the pre-Obaminablecare act system, in which the government is not responsible for people’s health care, will not be on the table.

This was their goal all along! The Democrats lied to us, but they are politicians, so that should have been obvious — and, in fact, was obvious — to anyone who thought about it.
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3 Comments

  1. Citing ObamaCare, Maryland’s Largest Insurer Seeks 25-percent Rate Hike

    If you’re wondering just how affordable healthcare will be under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), consider this: Maryland’s largest insurer just proposed, on average, a 25-percent rate hike for individuals next year, with much of that increase directly attributable to the ACA’s mandates.

    CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, which insures about 70 percent of Marylanders who buy insurance on the individual market — 120,000 people — submitted its proposed rates to the Maryland Insurance Administration. The agency then posted the proposals on its website as required for those carriers seeking to sell coverage on the state’s insurance exchange. (Maryland is one of 24 states plus the District of Columbia that have opted to set up their own exchanges, either alone or in partnership with the federal government.)

    The huge premium increase — CareFirst’s rates have risen about seven to 10 percent annually in recent years — “is the practical result of opening the pool to everyone,” CareFirst CEO Chet Burrell told the Baltimore Business Journal. That is, by forcing insurers to accept all comers and charge them the same rates regardless of pre-existing conditions, ObamaCare has vastly increased insurers’ liability, and the only way for them to remain solvent under such conditions is to charge their customers significantly higher rates.

    Not all CareFirst customers will be affected equally. The 60 percent whose plans aren’t changing next year will experience smaller increases because they will be exempt from some of the ACA’s requirements; but as soon as their plans do change, these people can expect to see their rates skyrocket, too.

    More at the link.

  2. Pingback: Bending the cost curve upward « THE FIRST STREET JOURNAL.

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