Closing in on $16 Trillion

As of Thursday, August 30, 2012, the national debt stood at $15,990,541,092,391.91. It grew from $15,976,519,029,144.14 the previous Thursday, or $14,022,063,247.77. If the national debt grows by the same amount in the next week, it will stand at $16,004,563,155,639.68, topping $16 trillion, on the night that President Obama accepts the nomination of the Democratic Party for a second term in office; such would be fitting indeed.

You can click on the icon in this post, or in the right-hand sidebar, for the national debt to the penny, direct from the Department of the Treasury.

Remember the guy on the right? I wonder whatever happened to him?

4 Comments

  1. If we raise taxes on those making greater than $250K, and gradually close their loopholes, and trim DoD spending by about 20%, that would slow down the growth of our debt. Moreover, we should still pass the Jobs Act which was rejected last Fall, which is an investment which will return jobs, exactly what we need to increase demand for goods and services, thus grow both more jobs and our GDP. Let’s be more sensible, folks!

  2. Moreover, we should still pass the Jobs Act which was rejected last Fall, which is an investment which will return jobs

    Yeah, just like the stimulus brought unemployment down to around 5%, like Obama promised to halve the deficit by the end of his first term, and how ObamaCare would “control costs.”

    LMAO …

  3. Uhhh, the JOBS Act was passed, and signed into law by President Obama on April 5, 2012.

    Oh, that wasn’t the “Jobs Act” to which you referred? :) President Obama’s proposed American Jobs Act would have cost $447 billion, half the size of the failed 2009 stimulus bill, and done half as much: 0 x 0.5 = 0, all at a cost of half a trillion dollars. That doesn’t make much sense.

    Parts of it were passed, including an extension of unemployment benefits. It was broken up into several parts; the parts that the Democrats wanted to fund by increasing taxes on the top producers failed in the Senate, and the part that the Republicans wanted to pass — which had passed the House 405-16, something most people would call bipartisan — was successfully filibustered by the Democrats in the Senate because the bill would have financed the tax cut reductions with $30 billion in spending cuts.

  4. Wagonwheel says:
    September 1, 2012 at 09:26

    If we raise taxes on those making greater than $250K

    WW, why do you hate rich people? Why do you want to punish job creators? When was the last time a poor person gave you a job? This all hatered all the time from the Left is ruining this country. What do we do when we run out of rich people like France, Maryland and New York are experiencing?

Comments are closed.