Do the Wealthy Work Harder Than the Rest?

I know this is a daring concept and one that likely does not sit well with some–especially those who believe that a 40-hour week is a God-given right.

As a former teacher, I cringe when I hear bleating from teachers who complain that they are overworked and underpaid.  Sure, teachers’ salaries aren’t very high–and some are just plain low–but in spite of what the complainers try to make you believe, many enter the profession not because of their desire to better the world, one child at a time (although that is how it works with many good teachers), but because of the family-friendly work hours and the usually very good benefits.

Of course, most teachers’ days do not always end when the 3:00 bell sounds.  However, built into teachers’ work schedules are an hour — sometimes two hours — of planning time, where they can use that time to create lesson plans and/or grade papers, so the complaint that the workday extends past the closing bell is not a particularly valid one.  Of course, there are teachers who use their planning time to socialize in the teachers’ lounge and to gossip about their students — and there is lots of gossip — but that is up to them.  After school activities like coaching and sponsorship of organizations almost always include extra pay for the teachers performing those duties.

What other job includes a fall break, a winter break, a spring break and an extended summer break?  How many jobs include free parking and very inexpensive lunches — generally no more than 10% more than what the students are charged. Healthcare benefits and life insurance benefits are as good as or better than those offered in major corporations, where many professionals (and teachers are college-educated professionals) are expected to put in 60+ hours/week on a routine basis.

Obama’s Class Warfare — and teachers are often on the front lines of that war — rarely, if ever, takes into consideration the difference in the hours and the structure of the evil wealthy people whose jobs they demonize.

Of course, not everyone who works long hours becomes wealthy.  Some, who in spite of their education and their training, do not make it into the leagues of the wealthy.  However, it is rare that you hear those hard workers complaining about the wealthy.  Instead, the Occupy Movement participants and those who have made class envy an art form are loath to use their hands for much more than to extend them for a handout nor are they willing to give up the comfort of their relatively brief work days and their relatively extensive vacations to do much more than complain and waste their time envying others.

  • April 27, 2012, 3:09 PM ET


Do the Wealthy Work Harder Than the Rest?

One of the most controversial issues surrounding inequality is work effort. Some on the right argue that top earners are successful in part because they work harder than others. Many on the left argue that the middle class and poor work just as hard – maybe even harder, with multiple jobs — but that the economic deck is stacked against them.

A new study offers evidence that higher-educated (and therefore higher-earning) Americans do indeed spend more time working and less time on leisure than poorer income groups. In fact, while income inequality may be growing, “leisure inequality” – time spent on enjoyment – is growing as a mirror image, with the low earners gaining leisure and the high earners losing.

The paper, by Orazio Attanasio, Erik Hurst and Luigi Pistaferri, finds that both income inequality and consumption inequality (the stuff that people buy) have increased over the past 20 years.

The more surprising discovery, however, is a corresponding leisure gap has opened up between the highly-educated and less-educated. Low-educated men saw their leisure hours grow to 39.1 hours in 2003-2007, from 36.6 hours in 1985. Highly-educated men saw their leisure hours shrink to 33.2 hours from 34.4 hours. (Mr. Hurst says that education levels are a “proxy” for incomes, since they tend to correspond).

A similar pattern emerged for women. Low-educated women saw their leisure time grow to 35.2 hours a week from 35 hours. High-educated women saw their leisure time decrease to 30.3 hours from 32.2 hours. Educated women, in other words, had the largest decline in leisure time of the four groups.

Full report here: http://blogs.wsj.com/wealth/2012/04/27/do-the-wealthy-work-harder-than-the-rest/

46 Comments

  1. My work week is standardized at 52½ hours per week, assuming that the plant is open only during “normal” business hours; there are many times when I have to either start early or work later.

    The problem for pubic school teachers is that their unions are frequently demanding that the taxpayers, who, on average, earn less than teachers, must be taxed more to pay for increases in teachers’ compensation. That will never go over well.

  2. I believe that the taxpayers resent not only the militant demands for increased compensation by teachers, but it is the sense of entitlement that their unions promote. Why, for example, should taxpayers be expected to cover the entire cost of health insurance for teachers (as the Wisconsin teachers’ union is demanding) when very few of those taxpayers’ health insurance is given to them gratis? What other profession grants tenure–sometimes called employment insurance because tenure has such negative connotations? For example, the New Jersey teacher of autistic children who was caught on tape berating, bullying and demeaning a child in her classroom is still on the job because that job is protected by her union. Story here: http://news.gather.com/viewArticle.action?articleId=281474981295064

    Taxpayers correctly resent the almost absolute stranglehold teachers’ unions have on the public education, especially when all too often the outcome does not equal the justification for the unions’ demand.

  3. As a former teacher, I cringe when I hear bleating from teachers who complain that they are overworked and underpaid. Sure, teachers’ salaries aren’t very high–and some are just plain low–but in spite of what the complainers try to make you believe, many enter the profession not because of their desire to better the world, one child at a time (although that is how it works with many good teachers), but because of the family-friendly work hours and the usually very good benefits.

    Amen, Gretchen. That’s precisely right (I’m a teacher). Way too many teachers forget the excellent bennies they receive, despite a not-so-stellar salary. During these economic times, that’s a real plus. Hell, it’s a plus even in good times!

  4. I didn’t know you are a teacher, Koolo! Good for you!

    I am prouder of my teaching profession than of any other work I have ever done. Like you, I chose the profession, knowing full well that a country club membership would probably never be included in my teaching contract. I belonged to the teachers’ union (OEA) because until Oklahoma became a Right-to-Work state, it was mandated that I join the union as a requisite for employment. Not everything the union did was bad, of course. Many of those benefits provided for teachers are the result of union bargaining. I wonder, though, if local school boards might be even more generous with benefits if the process weren’t so contentious. Non-union entities seem to do all right without the fist shaking. No doubt, when unions–any unions–become militant voices for a particular political party, often contrary to the wishes of their membership, then those unions become part of the problem–not the solution to whatever problems they purport to exist to resolve.

  5. “For example, the New Jersey teacher of autistic children who was caught on tape berating, bullying and demeaning a child in her classroom is still on the job because that job is protected by her union.”

    Gretchen, the article you cited says nothing about the union being the reason that the teacher has been retained. The word “union” does not appear once in the article you cited.

    I get from the article that the offending person, an aide, has been discharged. The teacher still has her job, but at a different school, claiming that she was not in the room when the taped incident occurred. The boy’s father does not agree, and wants an apology. School officials claim that they have investigated the event and have taken the appropriate action.

    On what basis do you fault the union, Gretchen? Again, I don’t see the word “union” in the article you referenced.

    Look at the first paragraph in the article:

    “A New Jersey teacher who bullied an autistic child is being called out for her despicable actions. Stuart Chaifetz is a single father raising his 10-year-old autistic son and unfortunately, has learned first-hand how cruel people can be. Akian Chaifetz was subjected to some of the most horrible treatment any child can suffer from–bullying. But Akian was not bullied by classmates or other children who did not know any better; he was bullied by his teacher and aides.”

    The author, Mia Meadows, has rendered the teacher guilty of abuse of the child, without any evidence to prove even an allegation of guilt. This is poor reporting, and her conclusion of guilt should be dismissed forthwith by the reader.

    This strikes a chord with me, first that a child has been severely abused at his school. Second, that the author is too quick to blame the teacher without any evidence presented, only an assumption of guilt. And third, that the union was blamed by Gretchen, with no evidence.

    I am surprised, koolo, that you did not pick up on these points. And I am surprised, well not really, that Gretchen was so quick to blame the union, without evidence.

    The attitude of parents toward teachers has changed over the years since I was a kid, and it is unfortunate. If a child came home with a note from the teacher about a behavior problem, it used to be practically automatic for the child to be blamed and punished at home, an indication of the trust in the teacher. Now, it seems like that trust has deteriorated. Too many parents seem sensitive to a minority of anecdotal occurrences, then extrapolate same over all teachers. My observations, both as a parent and as a teacher, is that the lack of trust is not warranted.

    However, perhaps the well-publicized problem we have had with Catholic Priest misbehaviors has something to do with the breakdown in trust. Moreover, there have also been a handful of teachers who have misbehaved in like manner, including several recent cases right here in Sussex County, DE. And then there is Dr Bradley, a pediatrician here, who is alleged to have abused over a hundred of his patients. Or worse, that our culture has suffered a major breakdown in trust with respect to our political leaders, thus an overriding trust problem.

    I finish by citing the example of Finland. We read about Finland, whose students perform at the top in the basic subjects. From personal knowledge, I can tell you that becoming a teacher in Finland is difficult, because the school system chooses only the best candidates, and, the position of teacher carries with it high prestige and remuneration. We need to ask ourselves why this is not true in America, and what we can do to make it true?

  6. “Of course, most teachers’ days do not always end when the 3:00 bell sounds. However, built into teachers’ work schedules are an hour — sometimes two hours — of planning time, where they can use that time to create lesson plans and/or grade papers, so the complaint that the workday extends past the closing bell is not a particularly valid one.”

    I cannot speak for your teaching experiences, Gretchen, nor for the way it is in general in your state of OK, but I can speak of mine in Fairfax County, VA, to which your observations are far from the reality I witnessed and engaged personally. I found myself in the midst of very hard working and dedicated teachers during my ten years in the ’90′s, putting far more effort and hours into their profession in their students’ behalf, and the student outcomes proved the effectiveness of the efforts exerted.

    Frankly, I even question the accuracy of your depiction of your teacher colleagues. I have the feeling you have picked the worst of them to depict.

    And then we have this from the very knowledgeable person who has told us that he is not interested in teaching because he does not have the patience:

    “The problem for pubic school teachers is that their unions are frequently demanding that the taxpayers, who, on average, earn less than teachers, must be taxed more to pay for increases in teachers’ compensation. That will never go over well.”

    All the more reason, Mr Editor, that you should be interested to adequately reward those who are responsible for teaching and preparing you children for their future successes. What a lousy attitude you have toward their teachers!

  7. Is the man who wrote this:

    The author, Mia Meadows, has rendered the teacher guilty of abuse of the child, without any evidence to prove even an allegation of guilt. This is poor reporting, and her conclusion of guilt should be dismissed forthwith by the reader.

    really the same man who wrote this?

    I think we know enough to conclude that the perp, Mr Zimmerman, should have been incarcerated and questioned intensely.

    We also know that he was a self-appointed neighborhood watch individual who was patrolling with a hand gun, and that he decided on his own to pursue this young lad after being told not to do so.

    Also, the Sanford Chief of Police and the FL State Investigator have both stepped down.

    The legislator who originated the “stand your ground” law has said that his law has been misapplied in this case.

    This incident has touched a nerve, because it appears to some that the Jim Crow ideology may well be resurfacing in this case, though I do agree that there is more that needs to be learned about this case, especially regarding the background of this perp Mr George Zimmerman.

    :)

  8. Is the man who wrote this:

    The author, Mia Meadows, has rendered the teacher guilty of abuse of the child, without any evidence to prove even an allegation of guilt. This is poor reporting, and her conclusion of guilt should be dismissed forthwith by the reader.

    really the same man who wrote this?

    I believe that is the second game, set, and match from the Editor to SINP today!

  9. Wagonwheel: On what basis do you fault the union, Gretchen? Again, I don’t see the word “union” in the article you referenced.

    I am surprised that you would take the side of the union and the teachers, in spite of the recorded evidence of their cruelty, and not the side of the autistic student.

    Currently under New Jersey’s tenure system, which was the result of negotiations with the teachers’ union, a novice teacher is placed on probation for three years. During or after these three years, the principal must decide if the school will grant tenure to this teacher. If so, the teacher will be asked to work there for a fourth year and will be granted tenure. The principal is able to fire a teacher at any time during the probation period, but once the teacher gains tenure in New Jersey, it is virtually impossible to fire that teacher.

    Take a few moments to listen to the taped recordings of the abuse heaped upon the student and then see if you support the teacher or the union negotiated tenure that has kept her on the payroll, albeit at a different school:

    http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepavlich/2012/04/26/tenured_new_jersey_union_teacher_to_10yearold_autistic_child_shut_up_bastard

  10. “What a lousy attitude you have toward their teachers!”

    He has no “lousy attitude” toward their teachers Wagonwheel. He has an additude toward union supported public school teachers. And he stated such.

    Then this Wagonwheel gem: “Frankly, I even question the accuracy of your depiction of your teacher colleagues. I have the feeling you have picked the worst of them to depict.”

    You question Gretchen’s accuracy? Based on what? Oh yeah, your “feelings”. Well I have a “feeling” you have no idea about her depictions. And I also have a feeling Gretchen’s depiction was based on a totality of her experiences which you could never understand.

    Further, in the true style of Obama (nothing’s ever my fault ) you switch the blame to Catholic priests, then a pediatrician and finally the “breakdown in trust with respect to our political leaders” none of which have a damn thing to do with teachers, now do they?

  11. Also, it is not uncommon for an acquitted teacher to be transferred so as to prevent any potential disruption in the educational setting, i.e. parents who may not believe the legal outcome, etc. I personally know a teacher to whom this occurred.

  12. First of all, Mr Editor, my intent in the piece on Zimmerman was focused on investigation of the alleged crime. From what we know now, since Zimmerman has been arrested and charged, I was correct. In contrast, Gretchen assumed that the teacher was guilty without evidence. Your contrast is meaningless.

    Secondly, lemming koolo adds his meaningless two cents, with not one comment about the issues in Gretchen’s piece, because it is impossible for him to agree with anything that I write. That’s on your wingnuttiness, koolo, demonstrating your weakness of mind, my noting by now that you are practically incapable of thought independent of your politics.

    And Gretchen, did you read where I acknowledged that the child had been severely abused and that it strikes a chord with me? The tape recordings illustrate and underline this god-awful abuse. But to my ears it does not indicate who the perp(s) are.

    My point is that the author was exhibiting a rush to judgment, and you were implicating the union for protecting the teacher’s job, when there was no evidence of either the union’s actions nor the guilty party. Judging by the actions of the school, we can assume that the aide was guilty. We still don’t know about the teacher’s role.

    The three of you are politicizing this whole affair, condoning the rush to justice without evidence, and implicating the union without evidence. Is this all you Righties know how to do?

  13. “He has an additude toward union supported public school teachers.”

    No, Hoagie, our Editor has an attitude against unions, period. So do your. On the contrary, neither of you ever speak out against the harm done upon millions of Americans by manipulative and fraudulent Wall Streeters. Why is that Hoagie. Is it because you are a weak-kneed wingnut? I say yes!

    “You question Gretchen’s accuracy? “

    Absolutely! Hers was an anti-teacher screed. I react to that!

  14. And koolo, I did not see your two statements, both of which are well stated and true, in my opinion. Therefore I retract the specificity of my previous statement.

    Oh, golly gee. I’m soooo honored. But, you still can’t help yourself:

    Why is that Hoagie. Is it because you are a weak-kneed wingnut? I say yes!

    Who was it again who was screaming and hollering at me about personal attacks? Now Wall Street is brought into a thread about teachers. First it was Catholic priests. Next it will be voter ID as disenfranchisement … again.

    SINP: He gives hypocrisy a whole new definition.

  15. Absolutely! Hers was an anti-teacher screed. I react to that!

    IOW, because back in the late 1800s I was a teacher too, therefore I know what teaching is all about, and if it contradicts my POV about the profession, then it ain’t true!

  16. “Further, in the true style of Obama (nothing’s ever my fault ) you switch the blame to Catholic priests, then a pediatrician and finally the “breakdown in trust with respect to our political leaders” none of which have a damn thing to do with teachers, now do they?”

    Priests are teachers, aren’t they Hoagie? I was talking about a breakdown of trust, which involves attitudes toward teachers as well as those in other positions as well. How do you think that Bradley’s alleged abuse of young children impacts on moms when they take their young children to a pediatrician? You don’t think they will be a little apprehensive? You have no idea, Hoagie, how disturbed the population is here about what happened to so many of our children, and the lingering ramifications thereof. All you care about is finding fault with something I say, like it is all partisan, always in attack mode whenever possible.

  17. All you care about is finding fault with something I say, like it is all partisan, always in attack mode whenever possible.

    Clue to the clueless: This is what you do all the time in here.

  18. “IOW, because back in the late 1800s I was a teacher too, therefore I know what teaching is all about, and if it contradicts my POV about the profession, then it ain’t true!”

    You certainly, like the weak-kneed partisan that you are, were unwilling to step up and defend the profession against that screed. That’s another one on you, koolo. Are you and your colleagues like Gretchen described. If so, your school has a problem!

  19. You certainly, like the weak-kneed partisan that you are, were unwilling to step up and defend the profession against that screed. That’s another one on you, koolo. Are you and your colleagues like Gretchen described. If so, your school has a problem!

    Looks like you instantly forgot what I just posted, didn’t you SINP? And there’s TONS of evidence of how teachers unions are frequently partisan thugs who care very little about whom they’re supposed to care about. Just look at their shenanigans in Wisconsin during all the recall stuff. Oh, that’s right, you don’t care about that because you believe Walker is a “dictator.” With “knowledge” like that, it’s easy to see why you left the teaching profession. Or… were you asked to resign because you have a problem with self-control and anger issues, hmm?

  20. “Why is that Hoagie. Is it because you are a weak-kneed wingnut? I say yes!”

    You call me that then haqve the gall to wonder why Koolo and Hitchcock have more respect for a flea?

    And because Gretchen has voiced an anti-union position it becomes a “screed” and is subjet to your distain? All the while insinuating you either believe she’s lieing or in some way fabricating her depiction of her experiences with teachers.

    And again, Wall Streeter’s have nothing to do with an abusive teacher. Please pay attention Wagonwheel.

  21. WW errs:

    No, Hoagie, our Editor has an attitude against unions, period.

    No, he has an attitude toward public employee unions, which I’ve explained previously.

    A union in a private sector company has a responsibility to balance its demands with the economic realities required to keep the company in business. If the union somehow forces its demands to the point at which the company cannot remain profitable and competitive, the company goes out of business and the unionized employees lose their jobs. That is the ultimate discipline of the private sector, and te unions know this, even if they don’t always manage to get the balance correct.

    But in the public sector, there is no such discipline. Because the “customers” are taxpayers, and the government has the power to tax people, enforced by the police power of the state, if the unions can push their demands too high, the public sector can raise taxes; there’s no economic discipline of the union members losing their jobs by running the public sector out of business.

    And that’s what has happened to teachers. They have demanded ever more, and their wages are now higher, once they have some experience, than the wages of the taxpayers. As they demand more, they are asking that money be taken out of the pockets of people who make less than they do, to provide them with higher salaries, and this for jobs which give them two months of summer vacation.

  22. I never knew that Koolo was so old!

    I hit the insta-switch to SINP first person key on my keyboard … the latest in anti-moonbat technology!

  23. Koolo: Gretchen: FWIW, the teacher claims she was not in the room when the abuse happened. Her attorney claims it was classroom aides.

    I posted a link to a 17-minute audio tape on which two distinct female voices are recorded denigrating that child. The teacher, Kelly, and the aide, Jodi, are identified by the father of the child. If the teacher’s attorney can identify another person, apparently not a person who would have reason to be in that classroom since every report I have read has identified only one teacher and one teacher’s aide were assigned to that special needs class, that would provide an even greater reason to question how horribly this situation has been handled.

    Even if the teacher was not inside the classroom during each of the several exchanges, the reason the father had attached a recording device to his son was because he was getting stories that concerned him about what had gone on in that classroom. He took the appropriate first step to resolve any potential problems by calling for a conference where he was assured by the teacher that NO ONE had ever–or would ever–abuse a child in her classroom, either physically or verbally. It would be a stretch of anyone’s imagination to believe that what occurred on that audio tape was an isolated, one-time occurence. The teacher was in charge of that classroom. She bears the onus of what occurs inside that classroom and she failed miserably. However, because she is tenured, she is protected in a way that that poor little boy was not protected. He was the victim of a breakdown of the contract of trust between a teacher and her aide and their student, a student who was their helpless victim of abusive adults.

  24. I posted a link to a 17-minute audio tape on which two distinct female voices are recorded denigrating that child. The teacher, Kelly, and the aide, Jodi, are identified by the father of the child.

    I had read (via my cell phone) that the teacher had two aides at times; one was fired, and the other is on leave, if memory serves. Just reporting what I’ve read earlier. And, it would not be unusual for a teacher to have more than one aide for special needs kids, especially autistic kids. Our special needs teacher co-teaches with another certified teacher, and has two aides in the classroom too. That’s a total of four adults for less than ten kids in that class.

    Was the recording just a one-time thing? If the dad only used the tape one time, it certainly is reasonable to believe the teacher may be telling the truth. It is not inconceivable that the teacher was out of the room at the time (spec ed teachers have oodles of meetings every day), and the previous abuse complained about could also have occurred same. Or, even if the teacher was in the room, depending on the size of the room and how the teacher was otherwise occupied.

  25. Here you go:

    The father, Stuart Chaifetz, posted clips on YouTube days ago of secretly recorded audio that caught one adult calling his autistic 10-year-old son “a bastard.” A lawyer for the teacher, Kelly Altenburg, has denied that she was in the classroom when the abusive remarks were made and said an investigation by the district also found that Altenburg was not present. Officials say one school aide resigned, another was put on leave and a substitute aide was not invited back amid the allegations.

    There were three aides, it seems.

  26. I have a problem with Public School Teachers Union because they are NOT accountable to the TAXPAYERS of the School District. I would like to see contracts put up for Referendum for the Taxpayers to see what the School Board was coerced into giving. As it stands now, they negotiate, and I’m stuck with the bill with no recourse.

  27. Thank you for that info, Koolo.

    I continue to assert, however, that the teacher bears the ultimate responsibility for what occurred in that classroom. The reason the father audio-taped his son in the first place was because of the conflict between what Kelly, the teacher, assured him never happened in the classroom–verbal abuse by teachers (or aides) and the out-of-character behavior of his son.

    The whole situation is a mess, especially so since autistic children are often emotionally fragile under any circumstances.

  28. I continue to assert, however, that the teacher bears the ultimate responsibility for what occurred in that classroom. The reason the father audio-taped his son in the first place was because of the conflict between what Kelly, the teacher, assured him never happened in the classroom–verbal abuse by teachers (or aides) and the out-of-character behavior of his son.

    Yeah, there is that of course. I’d be interested in if there was an investigation after the initial complaints and all. Then again, it might have been hard to verify. What could have happened? The teacher and admins question the aides and they say “No, no way — we never did anything like that.” I don’t see what other steps the school could have done to investigate; however, if I was that teacher, I’d certainly have been a lot more aware of the situation and been on the lookout for any abuses. Hell, I might’ve even posted an audio or video unit somewhere in the room to discover for myself. As you say, it was her classroom, and if I was her, I’d want to make DAMN sure none of that crap was happening in MY room.

  29. I have a friend who was an appliance repair guy. He was tired of working for the “man” and he opened his own appliance store about 1976. In a few years he outgrew that store. So instead of finding another “rental”, he built a small “strip” shopping center with room for three stores he rented out, plus his own store. He was tired of being landlord, so about 10 or so years later he sold the strip, and became a renter. Business was going well during these years he moved from his house to one three times bigger. Also, he bout about a 35 ft powerboat. After that, he opened a store in York, PA with Maytag backing him. That went well, so he moved to a higher traffic and bigger store in York. A few nights a week he was open late, he still did appliance repairs, and most importantly, he’s hired about 8 to 10 people to do sales and service.

    He could have stayed working for the “Man”. Instead, he thought 50 to 60 hours a week being the man was a better deal. It was with a better house, better cars, and a cruising boat for his reward.

    Now, the occupy group would look at this as THEFT from the people and he should share. The answer to that is 150% enriched Bovine Feces.

  30. “I continue to assert, however, that the teacher bears the ultimate responsibility for what occurred in that classroom.”

    I am going to call you out again on your assumptions, Gretchen. Neither you nor koolo in his searches has shown evidence that the teacher knew that this boy was being abused.

    The abuse of this boy was outrageous, so I understand your feelings about that. But you simply cannot render the teacher guilty without evidence.

  31. “Now, the occupy group would look at this as THEFT from the people and he should share. The answer to that is 150% enriched Bovine Feces.”

    Interesting story, Yorkshire, but I don’t know where this conclusion comes from.

    I think the main thrust of the Occupy Movement is the rapid movement of wealth from the 99% to the 1%. Another is that money buys power through corrupt practices, such as we now see happening with the start of in the upcoming campaign. These two scenarios distort our system of government in ways that are not good for our people.

  32. “Hey Koolo, at least you’re a weak-kneed partisan, I’m just a wingnut.”

    Yeah, Hoagie, and I’m a Socialist and a Commie, according to you. What goes around comes around. But you’re right about koolo! :)

  33. “But in the public sector, there is no such discipline. Because the “customers” are taxpayers, and the government has the power to tax people, enforced by the police power of the state, if the unions can push their demands too high, the public sector can raise taxes; there’s no economic discipline of the union members losing their jobs by running the public sector out of business.

    And that’s what has happened to teachers. They have demanded ever more, and their wages are now higher, once they have some experience, than the wages of the taxpayers. As they demand more, they are asking that money be taken out of the pockets of people who make less than they do, to provide them with higher salaries, and this for jobs which give them two months of summer vacation.”

    Here we go again, Mr Editor.

    First of all, you forgot about arbitration in order to solve labor disputes involving public employees.

    Secondly, since you think teachers have it so nice, why don’t you join the profession? I would think you could meet the requirements for a certificate without too much trouble.

    Thirdly, I’ve discussed your two months off myth before. Many employees get up to one month off, which I had after 10 years with my employer, and 6 weeks after 20 years. Moreover, although I don’t know about koolo and Hube, but as a teacher I calculated that I worked more hours in a year than you do in a 40 hour week, not to mention that you probably get time and a half for overtime, not for me. Including grading papers and lesson planning, my typical week was 55-60 hours, sometimes more, for a 36 week school year, which calculates to about 50 weeks at 40 hours per week.

    So your assumptions about teachers’ work compared to the standard 40 hour week are incorrect, at least for my teaching experience.

    And then there are the 12 credits per five years to maintain certification, which is done at night or in the summer.

    Perhaps this might finally have you thinking a little differently the next time you think about the easy life/high pay for teachers, a myth.

  34. Supposedly, the teacher’s aide in question has been fired, but the father is on a campaign to get the teacher fired as well.

    Even tenure does not protect teachers from egregious violations, but it does make the standard for termination significantly higher; if it is proved that the teacher supervising the aide knew that the aide was acting in this manner, and failed to correct the aide and put a stop to it, tenure will not protect the teacher.

    However, the father is described as an activist who “once went on a hunger strike to protest cuts in special ed and twice ran unsuccessfully for a school board seat.” Your Editor suspects that the school board, obviously already familiar with Mr Chaifetz, is not inclined to take his side any more than is absolutely necessary.

  35. A question: was the child in question “mainstreamed” into a normal classroom, or was he segregated out into a special education setting?

    It is unlikely if he had moderate-severe autism. The fact that there were 3 aides in that classroom also indicates that mainstreaming was unlikely.

  36. Our school would have these children in attendance to mainstream classes, accompanied by an aide, who would then attempt to reinforce the subject matter later. They were expected to participate in class and take all tests.

    “Even tenure does not protect teachers from egregious violations, but it does make the standard for termination significantly higher; if it is proved that the teacher supervising the aide knew that the aide was acting in this manner, and failed to correct the aide and put a stop to it, tenure will not protect the teacher.”

    This is correct. However, in my school district there was/is no tenure, which is true across the entire state of Virginia.

  37. Our school would have these children in attendance to mainstream classes, accompanied by an aide, who would then attempt to reinforce the subject matter later. They were expected to participate in class and take all tests.

    Back in the old days? I find that exceedingly difficult to believe. In fact, I think you’re lying.

    However, in my school district there was/is no tenure, which is true across the entire state of Virginia.

    SINP engaging in a lie of omission. Virginia teachers “currently receive ‘continuing contracts,’ which are almost always renewed barring unusual circumstances.” This makes it virtually identical to tenure.

  38. Wagonwheel says:
    April 28, 2012 at 23:41

    “Now, the occupy group would look at this as THEFT from the people and he should share. The answer to that is 150% enriched Bovine Feces.”

    Interesting story, Yorkshire, but I don’t know where this conclusion comes from.

    I think the main thrust of the Occupy Movement is the rapid movement of wealth from the 99% to the 1%. Another is that money buys power through corrupt practices, such as we now see happening with the start of in the upcoming campaign. These two scenarios distort our system of government in ways that are not good for our people.

    It’s as simple as this, he’s now probably in the 0.5%. Being there, he becomes a natural target of Occupy Group who would see him as taking money from the 99% who need appliances and he’s one of the few around and our area has from the low, low 99% to the 1%.

  39. I think the main thrust of the Occupy Movement is the rapid movement of wealth from the 99% to the 1%. Another is that money buys power through corrupt practices, such as we now see happening with the start of in the upcoming campaign. These two scenarios distort our system of government in ways that are not good for our people.

    That’s what happens when government has too much power. As PJ O’Rourke once put it:

    When buying and selling are controlled by legislation,
    The first things to be bought and sold are legislators.

  40. “Back in the old days? I find that exceedingly difficult to believe. In fact, I think you’re lying.”

    Koolo, you are incorrigible! Moreover, you don’t know what you are talking about here!! Frankly, I could care less what you believe or don’t believe. You need serious help!

  41. Perry, over 40 percent of the US is Conservative. Over 35 percent of the US is Moderate. Barely 20 percent of the US is Liberal. And you’re in the left half of that 20 percent. That makes you the radical extremist, and not those of us Conservatives and Libertarians who comment on here.

    That makes you the incorrigible one and the one in dire need of help. That makes you the delusional one. But we already knew that, since you are severely dishonest and severely passive-aggressive. And since you have a habit of threatening people who say things you don’t like. And you have provided all the documentation necessary.

    But you will very soon provide even more documentation proving my point.

    Read Congressman Colonel Davy Crockett’s words again (for the first time, actually). Learn from Congressman Colonel Davy Crockett. Learn from history. Quit pushing your Socialist agenda, which has failed every Providence-forsaken time it has ever been tried. And grow the sheol up, before it’s too late.

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