Easter: The Most Holy Day Of The Year

Or is it?

Week of Passion…and Possible Divorce (God’s Perfect Timing) — Vip Ogola’s description of the week leading up to and including Easter/Passover Sunday. And I’d say that is a very apt description of all the events that took place from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday a little over 2,000 years ago.

What I’m about to deliver today will sound familiar to many who read my articles, because I’ve said it before on Truth Before Dishonor and the now archive-only Common Sense Political Thought, both of which had threads with worthwhile comments, although at CSPT, you have to scan through mostly rubbish in the comment section.

Easter is important.
Air is desirable.
Water has value.

There are many who consider Easter the most important celebratory day of the year. I may be one of them but I am not entirely certain. Let me explain my predicament, using a Progressive tool: Values Clarification (which is actually values modification).

You are planning a journey to colonize the moon. In your plans, you have to decide what to take with you. There will be no other trips to your colony for a year. You have limited space, so you will have to do without a lot of things you would prefer to have in order to make your life on the moon survivable. List these items in order of importance:

Housing unit
Cold-weather clothing
Hot-weather clothing
Food
Excavation tools
Compressed air
Lunar maps
Water
Lunar compasses

So, what did you decide was most important for your trip? Air, perhaps? Without air, nobody will survive longer than a few short minutes. Without water, nobody will survive more than a few days. Without food, nobody will survive more than a few weeks. Without proper shelter or clothing, it is highly unlikely you could survive a week. So it’s quite possible that air is the most important on the list. Or is it?

If you will not gain anything for a year, what importance is the fraction-of-year survival without a certain item compared to the importance of the fraction-of-year survival without a different item? No matter how you order it, if you’re missing one for that duration, you’re still just as dead after the year is up.

So, what celebratory day is more important? Easter, Christmas or Good Friday? Without Easter, there would be no Resurrection and thus no redemption of sin. There could be no Resurrection without the Crucifixion celebrated on Good Friday (which I believe is the wrong day). That means the redemption of sin could not occur. Without the Birth, there could be no Crucifixion. Without the Virgin Conception, everything is moot. Remove any one of these four events and the other three events lose all their value. Remove Jesus’ 33 years of sin-free life and all four events lose all their value. And, as Vip Ogola reminded me, if Joseph had divorced his betrothed Mary as she was pregnant with Jesus as he had strongly considered before Providence spoke directly to him, again, all would be moot.

So, in the grand scheme of things, can any of the events truly be ordered as more important than the others?

As I said, my earlier article discussing this issue provided some worthwhile comments from the readers, and even a philosophical/logical discussion or two. On the TBD article, my MUD-geek friend Adara (pray for her as she’s still emotionally healing from the recent loss of her mother, whom she talks about in that 2010 thread), who is Catholic, said I gave her food for thought and was mulling over what I wrote. She also asked why I suggested Good Friday may be the wrong day. I explained my reasoning and invited Jeff, a non-Christian Liberal Jew (who I don’t know is practicing or not), to delve into the math of it and the Jewish nature of it, Which he did.

As I said, the CSPT thread is mostly unrelated garbage but Tyro visited to give me article-related grief and I believe left with a better understanding than he started with. If you want to follow that particular conversation,
Link 1
Link 2
Link 3
Link 4
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Originally published on Truth Before Dishonor

***NOTE: Wagonwheel has promised not to comment on my articles; therefore, he is prohibited from commenting on my articles. PIATOR has fraudulently attempted to steal one of my own email addresses in order to attempt to bypass moderation; therefore, he and all of his socks are prohibited from commenting on my article. All with administrative access are fully permitted to irretrievably delete all comments made by Wagonwheel or PIATOR on this article, and all commenters are warned that any comments made in response to the prohibited could get their comments irretrievably deleted as well.

7 Comments

  1. I have heard other arguments that the Crucifixion must have occurred on a Wednesday, and that Jesus was buried for three entire days, the Resurrection occurring sometime Saturday evening; Mary Magdalene is recorded to have visited the tomb “Early on the first day of the week, while it was still dark,” (John 20:1) and found the tomb already empty. She could not have visited the tomb on Saturday, as that was the Sabbath.

    For a couple of denominations, this timeline is held as very important, but I don’t see it as absolutely necessary. The only thing we know for certain is that the tomb was empty on Sunday morning.

    For the Crucifixion to have occurred on a Friday, it would have to have occurred in either 30 or 33 AD, because only in those two years would Passover have been at the right time; Jesus is recorded as having eaten the Passover meal with his disciples the day before the Crucifixion. This article gives some astronomical evidence for the Crucifixion being on April 3, 33 AD.¹ There was a partial lunar eclipse visible in Judea on the evening of April 3, 33 AD. If the Crucifixion occurred in 33 AD, it would have had to have been on Friday. Other calculations put the Crucifixion in 34 AD. The truth is that we just don’t know, though some people insist that they do.
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    ¹ – The article makes reference to a supposed report from Pontius Pilate to Tiberias Caesar, but I have seen no evidence that that supposed report is genuine.

  2. The Romans were efficient administrators and compulsive record keepers. I recall discussions of the correspondence between Tiberias and Pilate in Roman History courses. It’s quite likely they got the date right.

  3. You are planning a journey to colonize the moon. In your plans, you have to decide what to take with you. There will be no other trips to your colony for a year. You have limited space, so you will have to do without a lot of things you would prefer to have in order to make your life on the moon survivable. List these items in order of importance:

    Housing unit
    Cold-weather clothing
    Hot-weather clothing
    Food
    Excavation tools
    Compressed air
    Lunar maps
    Water
    Lunar compasses

    Um, toilet paper?

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